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< Back to Active Lifestyle

Active Living While Social Distancing

Being active isn’t just good for your heart

Uncertainty is a common feeling these days as we navigate through something so strange as a global pandemic. It’s important to try and find comfort and normalcy in the unfamiliar. Our mood is likely affected by having to self-isolate from family and loved ones. There is an excess of spare time we never had before, so a healthy solution would be to make space for activity each day.  According to Harvard Health Publishing[1], you should “exercise to relax”. Exercise reduces levels of the body’s stress hormones, such as adrenaline and cortisol, and boosts endorphin release. Endorphins are chemicals in the brain that are the body’s natural painkillers and mood elevators – which explains why exercise makes you feel better. 

Active simply means activity

The biggest trick to staying active is to avoid it feeling like a chore, so find activities you enjoy. Having a family member in your home to tag along is a great incentive to stay fit. Staying active doesn’t mean you need a gym membership. It might mean; walking with a partner or your dog, running, practicing yoga, or even just choosing to close your eyes and meditate. Every little bit helps with your mental and physical wellbeing!

While it can be hard to get started and stay motivated, you don’t have to get up every day at 5 am and dedicate hours of your day to boost your health. According to the Harvard School of Public Health[2], just 30 minutes of moderate exercise 5 days a week is all most people need. The bottom line? Getting any amount of exercise is better than none at all.

Support your body

It’s important to practice safe exercise to reduce your risk of injury. There are lots of online resources available to follow along a qualified instructor for demonstrations of proper form. Always go at your own pace and take breaks as you need them so you don’t over-exert yourself.

You can also support your body through taking supplements. Omega-3’s help with the maintenance of good health as well as encouraging cardiovascular health – a win-win!

As we get older, maintaining bone density is important for overall health while leading an active lifestyle – especially for women who can suffer from calcium loss while aging. Lack of calcium significantly contributes to the development of osteoporosis. The good news is that we can get added calcium through our diet, but when in doubt it’s good to supplement to ensure your body is getting what it needs. Combining a healthy diet with calcium and magnesium can help support maintenance of bones. Look for bone-friendly ingredients like Collagen, Manganese, Boron, Vitamin K2 and Vitamin D3

Activity and mental health

There’s no doubt that exercise helps our physical health but it also supports our mental health. One facet of our mental well-being beyond mood is self-esteem. Building stamina and strength, along with mastery of whichever activity you choose, boosts your self-confidence. And guess what? You will take that self-confidence and discipline with you to any new activity and into all aspects of your life. So, make it a part of your daily routine to move your body. Being active is the ultimate full-body and mind strategy to the best version of yourself. Make sure to consult your healthcare practitioner if exercising is new to you.

[1] “Exercising to Relax.” Harvard Health Publishing, Harvard Medical School, Feb.2011, https://www.health.harvard.edu/staying-healthy/exercising-to-relax

 

[2] “Staying Active.” Harvard School of Public Health, Harvard T H Chan, 2018, https://www.hsph.harvard.edu/nutritionsource/staying-active/

 


About the Author: Genuine Health Team

“Genuine

Genuine Health believes that we should all have a vibrant, healthy life, and that a well-nourished body is the best way to get there. They work with renowned scientists and professionals at leading institutions and a panel of esteemed health experts, including researchers and doctors of natural and traditional medicine to back their formulas with research and clinically proven ingredients. Learn more at genuinehealth.com